Notes


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101 The 1901 Ontario Census for Phoebe Emeline McDowell refers to Irish Lineage. McDowell, Phoebe Emeline (I343)
 
102 The Cavan store is one of the oldest landmarks in Cavan/Millbrook. First owner in the early 1800's was John Knowlson. In this century there has been a succession of owners: Melburn McDowell, E. Papineau, M. McCullough, W.McCullough, Harry Stinson, WaIter Dyer, W. Reynolds, John Moore, Owen Gummer, D. Wittekoek, David Goddard, Al Senour, and John Chmarra. McDowell, Melburn (I89)
 
103 The early log school that Ethel Rose McKnight taught in was rough, small and ill-equipped. Like other log schools of this period, Whitfield's school would have been built by the men from the school district who combined their efforts to construct a building measuring 20 by 22 feet. The spaces between the logs were often filled with mud and there were generally two or three windows in the log structure which provided the only light in the room. The interior of the school room was furnished with makeshift benches without backs located around the walls of the room. There was a crude fireplace which provided the only warmth, a table or desk for the master or teacher and a water pail and one cup.

In 1863, at a cost of $607, one of the first brick school houses to be built in Cavan Township replaced the log school of 1841. A well was dug and there was a pump on the grounds. The minute books record the purchase of the blackboard in 1866. This advancement was probably made whenever a new brick school was built. From 1918 to 1930 Miss Ethel McKnight taught at Whitfield's. Many of her pupils earned the Baptie Scholarship for outstanding accomplishment. The building is now owned by the Lions Club. 
McKnight, Ethel Rose (I61)
 
104 The Fallis Line School joined others in 1946 to become part of the South Cavan School Area for which the first slate of officers were: J.H. McKnight, Chairman, A.V. Thorn, Secretary-treasurer, Allen Wood, Suttle Pritchard and Melville Strong. McKnight, John Henry (I77)
 
105 The Frames originally came from the county of Essex, England. Early in the 17th century, Archibald Frame settled in Castlefinn, Donegal, Ireland. His son, Mathew (b. 1748) emigrated to Nova Scotia in 1766 and married Elizabeth Murdock. They lived in Horton, then Stewiacke, where he rented a mill and lumber areas and finally lived at Shubenacadie. Frame, Mary Duncan (I754)
 
106 The Hampton/Moore home was on the west side of the Tapley Quarter Line between the Fallis Line and the Millbrook Road, just south of Marshall Fallis' home. Family F5
 
107 The McKnight family was firmly entrenched on the south side of the 7th concession, east of Whitfield School, where my Aunt Ethel McKnight taught for 12 years. She walked to and from her home on the 3rd farm east of the Cavan to Millbrook Road. William McKnight (my grandfather and Ethel's father) owned the farm and raised 6 boys and 2 girls.

Immediately to the east of this farm, Jonathan McKnight had his property showing a beautiful house on the south side of the road. It is still standing.

The William McKnight house and barn were demolished a few years ago.

Immediately west was the farm owned by my uncle Robert J. McKnight who specialized in the showing of Clyde horses at many agricultural shows in the area. He was called upon to judge many horse shows. Robert married May Brown and they had one son George. George married Isabel Dawson (east of Bailieboro) and they were blessed with a son, David William and a daughter, Dorothy Armstrong (Mrs. Harvey Challice) Elizabeth Ann who married Glen Pinsoneault and they live in the Windsor area with their 2 children.

David William married Kathleen Ada Mills. With the early death of his wife May, Robert's second marriage was to Mae McCredie and their family was one daughter Ruth who married Fred C. Hill of Alberta. Robert's brother John Henry (my father) married Mabel Connell in 1912. They started their farming north of Ida and then moved to a stone house on the north-east corner of the Centre Road and the 8th Concession.

On Jan. 21, 1918, we were burned out. It was about 2 a.m. when my father realized that fire was breaking through the upstairs bedroom ceiling. These were the days when there were no fire trucks. I can recall the event very clearly. I was wrapped in a blanket and placed in a snow bank. My parents attempted to retrieve some valuables. Mother had received a fur coat (possibly for Christmas) and a cash present was in the pocket. My father charged back into the house, raced to the upstairs bedroom, grabbed the coat and started to come down when the steps gave away. Fortunately, some of the members of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows were returning from their lodge meeting in Millbrook and were able to get my father out. One of those men was Arthur Vance, a long time resident of Millbrook. My memory of that night is vivid. They wrapped my mother and me in horse blankets and rushed us over to the residence of Lloyd Sutton. That trip, although not very far, was one of the longest I have ever had. The horse blankets had had repeated soakings of horse urine and had been saturated with horse sweat with the result that the ammonia fumes nearly stifled me. I can still smell that odour and I remember the pains in my chest when I tried to hold my breath.

During the early spring and summer of 1918, we lived in a driving shed where the sliding doors could be opened up to expose the total interior. There must have been skiffs of snow through the cracks as I recall my father coaching me how to get out of bed and not allow the snow to tumble back into the bed. There must have been a gap in the driving-shed wall as I can remember a pig coming through at another time it was a flock of geese. It was always a big event when friends dropped in and we could slide the driving shed doors open, making an excellent front door approach.

During 1919, my father purchased the 5th Concession farm about 1 1/2 miles west of the Centre Road past the Presbyterian cemetery. Incidentally this cemetery, sometimes called McMahon's cemetery, holds the graves of my father and mother, my grandfather and grandmother, and my great grandfather and great grandmother.

This farm, Lot 10, Conc. 5 was originally owned by James Hunter. It is interesting to note that the down payment, the balance, the interest rate, the surveyors' stakes and timing were all done by the shake of the hand.

Around 1935 I left to go to Peterboro Business College and started to work. I was married in 1942 to Madeline McDowell.

Going back to my father, John, and his brother, Robert, they had 2 sisters, Ethel and Margaret. As I said before, Ethel was a school teacher, and to my knowledge, that was the only school in which she taught. She was married later in life to Ken Reid of Reaboro, and adopted 2 children, William David and Eleanor. Eleanor has 3 children while William has 1 daughter.

Ethel's sister, Margaret, married Ernest Armstrong and settled on a farm about 3/4 of a mile west of the Cavan Middle Road on the north side of the 8th concession. They had 2 daughters, Mary and Dorothy. Mary married Hugh Moore, near Lindsay, and they have 4 children, all married, making a total of 20 for their 1988 Christmas family gathering.

Dorothy married a local Millbrook boy, Harvey Challice, who has made a name for himself far and wide as the "Potato King". They have 3 daughters and 1 son.
My uncle Jonathan McKnight lived in the house owned now by John Tinney and worked in McDowell's Egg Grading Station on the south side of the main street. He had one son, Fred who enlisted in the Army in World War L Fred was the victim of a flu epidemic in England and died on Noy. 11, 1918. His body was returned to Canada and his father made sure he had a proper funeral. The funeral consisted of muffled drums and bands,the parade of a large regiment complete with 21 gun salute and horses and buggies that reached from the cemetery back to the corner at Coombe's store (now Becker's Milk). I was told recently that a school teacher of that time, said that she heard the firing of the guns in the Whitfield School one mile away.

Our son Paul McKnight is happily married to a very clever French Canadian, Louise O'Donnell from Quebec. They have 2 lovely children, Robert and Jacqueline and live in North Vancouver, B.C. Our daughter Maribeth is married to Christopher Koester and they have a beautiful blondish-red daughter and live in Toronto.

My sister Edna married William Dean of Garden Hill. They have a family of 2 girls, Donna and Marilyn. Brother Donald McKnight and his wife Shirley Palmer live in Peterborough and they have 3 daughters, Pamela, Margot and Jennifer.

What I am trying to say is that, at one time, McKnights were common in Millbrook and Cavan Township. Today the only McKnight names in the community are carved on the stones in the cemetery. If you ever want a queer sensation, go back for a visit to your birthplace after fifty years and I am sure that you will get that feeling "Who's that stranger in town?"

Reg McKnight
This Green and Present Land 
McKnight, Reginald William James (I79)
 
108 The name Banes has shown up with various spellings. Banes, Bains, Baines, Bane, Bain in the same family. The first records found for Joseph Banes in Canada, are on the Assessment Rolls for Clark Twp, Newcastle District in 1829.

The village of Newcastle was started in 1828. 
Banes, Joseph (I1213)
 
109 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Armstrong, Allan David (I152)
 
110 There is a hill west of Garden Hill that is called "Dean's Hill", the farm Charles William "Bill" Dean grew up on is at the base of this hill. Dean, Charles William (I92)
 
111 This is cornerstone of this website. It started with Robert James McKnight (ID#1), then came Mary White (ID#2).

The McKnights came from County Down, Ireland, in the early 1830's on the same ship with the Whites of South Monaghan, and the Wrights. A grandson, Dr. John Wright, was a well,known and respected doctor for many years in Millbrook and father of Allan Wright of Cavan Township at Bailieboro. Mrs. Clarence Ball (Ula White) is a descendent of the Whites. It took nine weeks under sail to make the trip from Ireland. Mary White was seasick all the way over. When the river narrowed the ship was towed up the St. Lawrence River to Montreal by oxen. The Wrights settled in Hope Township, the Whites in South Monaghan and the McKnights in Cavan Township. Robert James McKnight married Mary White. He died in 1894 and she died in 1918 aged 88. They first settled in South Monaghan but soon moved to Lot 14, Cone. 6, Cavan Township.

County Down (named after its county town, Downpatrick) is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland, situated in the north-east of the island of Ireland. Adjoined to the south-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 2,448 kmĀ² and has a population of about 531,665. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland and is within the province of Ulster.

The county was archaically called Downshire. It borders County Antrim to the north, the Irish Sea to the east and south, County Armagh to the west, and County Louth to the southwest. In the east of the county is Strangford Lough and the Ards Peninsula. The largest town is Bangor, on the northeast coast. Three other large towns and cities are on its border: Newry lies on the western border with County Armagh, while Lisburn and Belfast lie on the northern border with County Antrim. Down contains both the southernmost point of Northern Ireland (Cranfield Point) and the easternmost point of Ireland (Burr Point).

It is currently one of only two counties of Ireland to have a majority of the population from a Protestant community background, according to the 2001 census. The other is County Antrim. 
McKnight, Robert James (I1)
 
112 Thomas and Rebecca Potter arrived in Rudyard by Railway on March 15, 1897. They spent 2 weeks at the home of Hiram McDowell on the " Pea line", Rudyard, Pickford township line road 6 miles west of Pickford. Then rented a farm from Thomas Marks. Later a farm was purchased in T44N R2W Section 31, Pickford Township and they moved into the new home in 1908. In 1920 Thomas and Rebecca Moved to Sault Ste Marie, MI. Potter, Thomas (I426)
 
113 Thomas Beecroft owned a bank in Barrie, was on the board of directors of the Royal Victoria Hospital, and was mayor for a few years in the early 1900's. His daughter, Gladys Beecroft married Stanley Underhill. It was Stanley who, along with his brother owned the shoe factory in Barrie. The old factory was torn down in the 1980's. Stanley and Gladys Underhill had a son named Beecroft Underhill, but when he turned 21 he legally changed his first name to Douglas Beecroft, Thomas (I307)
 
114 Thomas Choate, son of Jacob Choate and Fanny Marshall Burnham, was born April 3, 1809 near Cobourg, Upper Canada. His parents had emigrated to Glanbord from Enfield, New Hampshire in 1798, along with members of the Burnham family who were cousins of the Choates. In approximately 1801, they moved to Hamilton Township, north of Cobourg, where Thomas was born, and by 1812, the family had moved to Port Hope, Upper Canada. Thomas learned the trade of millright at Warsaw, New York, and also studied music at Batavia, New York. In 1830, Thomas married Mary Wright, daughter of Richard Wright and Ann Stuart of Skiberne, County Cork, Ireland. Thomas and Mary had five children: Thomas George, Anna Eliza, Mary Jane, Richard Marshall, and Jacob Stuart. In 1834-35, Thomas was sent to Dummer Township by his uncle, the Honourable Zaccheus Burnham, to complete the construction of a saw and grist mill, which had already been started for Burnham by Thomas Hartwell. By 1836, the mill was in operation and Thomas moved his family to what was then known as Dummer Mills and built a general store. In 1842, Thomas successfully acquired the contract for a post office, and since a post office, required a village name, Thomas chose the name Warsaw. In 1839, Thomas\' first wife died and he married her sister, Eliza Wright. They had two children, Harriet Burnham and Mary, before Eliza died in 1845. In 1846, Thomas married Hanah Grover, daughter of Jonah Grover and Lucia Baldwin, of Norwood, Upper Canada. Thomas and Hannah had three children: Celestia Charlotte, James Grover, and Arthur Francis. Thomas\' eldest son, Thomas George, when he was old enough, took over running the mills for Zaccheus Burnham. Thomas George later established his own chair manufacturing shop on Quarry Lake. Thomas senior\'s main interest remained in the running of his store and post office, and with his duties as a Justice of the Peace. Thomas also established and conducted a singing school and choir which was under his tutelage for 60 years. Both he and his son, Thomas George became involved in the local temperence society and in local politics. Thomas retired from running the store in 1889, at the age of 80, and his youngest son, Arthur Francis, took over the business as manager and post master. In 1897, Arthur established a second store, Choate Supply Store, at McCraken\'s Landing, Stony Lake. Thomas died in 1900, at the age of 90. The Warsaw store was sold in 1927, and Arthur Francis died in 1931. The Choate Supply Store remained in business, and was managed by Arthur\'s wife Vida. When she died, the store was then managed by their daughter Bessie. The Choate Supply Store was sold out of the family in 1949. Arthur and Vida Elora Smith, also had a son, Richard (Dick), who was born in Warsaw in 1880. Dick was to become a journalist, artist and musician. Dick began his career with the Peterborough Examiner in 1905 and in his early days, worked for the Montreal Herald, the Buffalo Courier and some newspapers in Calgary and Vancouver. In 1908, Dick married Mary (May) Dawson Donnell, daughter of Elizabeth Ambrose and James Rea Donnell. Dick also worked in the United States for some time, and at one point in his career was a member of the Congressional Press Gallery in Washington, D.C. He later became the editor of the Toronto Daily News, editor of the Toronto Sunday World, and an editorial writer for the Toronto Globe. It is unknown when he died.

Trent University Archives  
Choate, Thomas (I2862)
 
115 Thomas Helie's father came from Scotland. Helie, Thomas (I1693)
 
116 Thomas lived on lot 28, concession 14 in East Wawanosh, Huron County, Ontario in 1899.

Many of the sources tell us that Thomas Campbell was born in Ireland, including his death registration which tells us that he was born in County Down. However some sources tell us that he was born in Scotland. It would appear that three of his children, Margaret, Mary Jane and John were born in Scotland. He immigrated between 1852 and 1854 to Canada.


 
Campbell, Thomas (I293)
 
117 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Mohr, Kevin (I2673)
 
118 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Mohr, Karl (I2674)
 
119 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Robinson, John (I2655)
 
120 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Robinson, James (I2603)
 
121 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Holly, Marie (I2649)
 
122 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Robinson, Leslie Ann (I2657)
 
123 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Robinson, Joanne (I2656)
 
124 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Holly, Edith (I2650)
 
125 Underhill, Stanley Gordon: Stanley Underhill married Gladys Beecroft. It was Stanley who, along with his brother owned the shoe factory in Barrie. The old factory was torn down in the 1980's. Stanley and Gladys Underhill had a son named Beecroft Underhill, but when he turned 21 he legally changed his first name to Douglas. Underhill, Stanley Gordon (I1436)
 
126 Underhill, Stanley Gordon: Underhill's had a large shoe factory in BARRIE, Ontario, on what is now DUNLOP STREET, EAST, on the waterfront, in operation up until the mid 1950's. Would suggest that Simcoe County Archives, the Simcoe County OGS,The Barrie Examiner (newspaper) Archives, should be full of trivia on the Underhill Shoe Factory. In 1950, two Underhill Brothers operated the factory, and were at logger-heads with each other. They dealt with The Bank of Toronto Underhill, Stanley Gordon (I1436)
 
127 Vowles, Amber: Separated in 2004 Vowles, Amber (I199)
 
128 Wallis, Frederick R.: James Edward Wallis, born in Clifton Cottage on the shores of Lake Huron, between Goderich and Bayfield, Ontario, Canada, was the father of nine children. He came to this area alone in 1890, looking for land on which some of his boys could settle, because there was none available in Bayfield Township where he lived. After exploring, he chose two sections bordering the Munuscong River, south and east of the present village of Rudyard, and purchased them from the railroad. When their father returned home, John and Fred, ages 20 and 19 respectively, were sent on their great adventure to the wild country of Northern Michigan. At that time there were only trails and paths through the woods for travel, but the Old Mackinac Trail led from the Sault through both of their sections. John chose the land north of the Rudyard Trail and Fred settled on the south section. Annie, a sister, came for a time to keep house for her brothers. She met and married Sidney Welch who had also came from Canada. Fred met Elizabeth Brundson, who with her family had also migrated from Canada. They were married July 1, 1896. Fred had built a small frame house on his property where the couple immediately settled. This house is still part of the Charles Wallis home. John would soon return to Canada to marry and return with his bride. ( See John Wallis History.)
"One story Grandfather Fred liked to tell about his courtship was his walks to the Brundson farm about four miles away on the other side of the river. In the spring when the river was in flood he walked to the edge but could find no log to walk across, so he took off his clothes, tied them in a bundle, threw them to the other side, and swam the river. After dressing again, he proceeded to his girl friend's home."
John and Fred cleared land in the summer and planted what they could. They worked in lumber camps in the winter to make money to buy provisions and other needed equipment. The wives did chores and looked after things at home. They assisted each other and acted as midwives when their children were born. (Information is from the Rudyard Centennial Book, 1883 Rudyard Mich. 1983 First Hundred Years) 
Wallis, Frederick R. (I682)
 
129 Wallis, James Edward: Father and Mother are buried in the same Cemetery Plot, with James Edward and Elizabeth (Banting) Wallis, there are no markers or stones (No Names) for the Father and Mother. This note is scribed on James and Elizabeth Headstone. Wallis, James Edward (I693)
 
130 Wayne Arthur Beecroft cremated remains were inserted into the coffin of Melville Beecroft. Beecroft, Wayne Arthur (I1431)
 
131 White, Mary: The McKnights came from County Down, Ireland, in the early 1830's on the same ship with the Whites of South Monaghan, and the Wrights. A grandson, Dr. John Wright, was a well,known and respected doctor for many years in Millbrook and father of Allan Wright of Cavan Township at Bailieboro. Mrs. Clarence Ball (Ula White) is a descendent of the Whites. It took nine weeks under sail to make the trip from Ireland. Mary White was seasick all the way over. When the river narrowed the ship was towed up the St. Lawrence River to Montreal by oxen. The Wrights settled in Hope Township, the Whites in South Monaghan and the McKnights in Cavan Township. Robert James McKnight married Mary White. He died in 1894 and she died in 1918 aged 88. They first settled in South Monaghan but soon moved to Lot 14, Cone. 6, Cavan Township. White, Mary (I2)
 
132 Wiens, Jacob L.: Lincoln Memorial Park Wiens, Jacob L. (I805)
 
133 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Reid, William David (I63)
 
134 William Densmore was one of the original grantees of Newport Township 1761. On 1 January 1779 he leased 2 acres in Newport, N.S. from Winckworth Tongs as a house lot for a term of 21 years. On January 12 1784 Densmore assigned this lease to Benjamin DeWolf, Windsor merchant "by discount of money I owe him" Densmore, William (I353)
 
135 William Kenneth Reid farmed all his life on the 9th Concession of Ops County - now called Slanted Road. Reid, William Kenneth (I62)
 
136 William Kenneth Reid owned quite a bit of land around Pigeon Lake, north of Lindsay. Donated land that is now called "Ken Reid Conservation Area" for public use. Reid, William Kenneth (I62)
 
137 William McDowell was born in 1812 on the boat coming to Canada from Ireland. McDowell, William Sr. (I270)
 
138 William McDowell was born on the boat coming to Canada from Ireland. His family lived first in Nova Scotia. He married Phoebe Densmore in 1840 and their first son, John McDowell, was born in Nova Scotia in 1843. The family moved from Nova Scotia, live for a time in New York State, and in 1855 moved to the Township of East Wawanosh, settling on the south half of Lot 34, Concession 6, about a mile north of the Westfield Church. John and his brother Robert were old enough to remember coming up the Erie Canal through New York State with all the family's possessions. - Taken from Wilderness to Wawanosh Page 109
 
McDowell, William Sr. (I270)
 
139 Winters, Mary: Mary Torrey had 4 girls and 1 boy (not recorded here) Reid, Mary (I69)
 
140 Winters, Mary: was born in 1819 in Norfolk, England. The 1871 census tells us that Mary was born in Ontario. She immigrated before 1838. She appeared in the census in 1861 in Puslinch Township, Wellington County, Canada West. Mary was Anglican in 1861. She was Methodist in 1871. She appeared in the census in 1871 in East Wawanosh, Huron County, Ontario. Mary appeared in the census in 1881 in East Wawanosh, Huron County, Ontario. She appeared in the census in 1891 in East Wawanosh, Huron County, Ontario. At the time of the 1891 census Mary was living with her daughter and son in law, Hannah and George Henry. She died on 2 Jun 1892 at the age of 73 in East Wawanosh,Huron County, Ontario. She is called Keziah on the death registration of her son George, perhaps her name was Mary Keziah. Winters, Mary (I317)
 
141 Worr, Mary Ann
b. 25 Aug 1855
England
d. 11 Dec 1927
Lot 19 Conc 8 Manvers Township Durham County Ontario Canada
m. Challice, John
www.tribalpages.com

Christening Oct. 21, 1855. Saint John, Preston, Lancashire, England
source: www.familysearch.org 
Worr, Mary Ann (I692)
 
142 Young/McKnight: Witnesses - Rev. Robert McKnight presided Family F501
 

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